A Bonfire Treat! Sticky Yorkshire Ginger Parkin with Quince and Pomegranate Compote

A Bonfire Treat! Sticky Yorkshire Ginger Parkin with Quince and Pomegranate Compote

A Bonfire Treat! Sticky Yorkshire Ginger Parkin with Quince and Pomegranate Compote

A Bonfire Treat!

Sticky Yorkshire Ginger Parkin with Quince and Pomegranate Compote

A Bonfire Treat! Sticky Yorkshire Ginger Parkin with Quince and Pomegranate Compote

A Bonfire Treat! Sticky Yorkshire Ginger Parkin with Quince and Pomegranate Compote

I LOVE sticky ginger parkin, it’s one of my favourite treats at this time of the year, and is JUST perfect for Bonfire night along with treacle toffee aka Tom Trot toffee, tomato soup in cups, chilli, stews, soups and toffee apples…..my recipe is simple, an old family recipe that my grandmother used to make, but I have added an extra ginger kick with crystallised ginger, as I am a REAL ginger nut! I DO have another gingerbread recipe, which is larger, bolder and spicier than this one…..Dark Sticky Double Gingerbread…….and that particular recipe is definitely not a shy retiring kind of gingerbread, but is a very dark and sticky piece of culinary work!

Dark Sticky Double Gingerbread

Dark Sticky Double Gingerbread

But this year, I wanted to share my family parkin recipe, which is also a double ginger recipe, but has oatmeal added for a lovely added texture. And, as I am still heavily into quince, I’m trying to use them all up, I decided to elevate my Sticky Yorkshire Ginger Parkin to another culinary level and serve it with a divine little Quince and Pomegranate Compote.…..the quince compote with added pomegranate syrup, (courtesy of Atkins and Potts is fragrant and musky with buttery undertones…..it’s quite simply divine! It’s the perfect accompaniment for the parkin, and I then heated the parkin up in the microwave for a few seconds before dolloping the compote over the top…..almost like a pudding, but in the afternoon with a cup of tea.

A Bonfire Treat! Sticky Yorkshire Ginger Parkin with Quince and Pomegranate Compote

A Bonfire Treat! Sticky Yorkshire Ginger Parkin with Quince and Pomegranate Compote

You can of course eat both of the recipes solo, the parkin can be served straight out of the tin, sticky and dark, on bonfire night, whilst the quince and pomegranate compote can be served with pancakes and ice cream.….or naked, as in straight out of the pan with crème fraîche or cream….

A Bonfire Treat! Sticky Yorkshire Ginger Parkin with Quince and Pomegranate Compote

A Bonfire Treat! Sticky Yorkshire Ginger Parkin with Quince and Pomegranate Compote

Parkin – let’s get historical for a moment:

Parkin or Perkin is a soft cake traditionally made of oatmeal and black treacle which originated in northern England. Often associated with Yorkshire, particularly the Leeds area, its precise origins are unclear, and it is very widespread and popular in other areas, such as Lancashire. Parkin is generally moist and even sometimes sticky. In Hull and East Yorkshire, it has a drier, more biscuit-like texture than in other areas. Parkin is traditionally eaten on Bonfire Night, the 5th of  November. 

The principal ingredients of a Yorkshire parkin are flour, oatmeal, black treacle (similar to molasses), fat (traditionally lard, but modern recipes use butter or margarine), brandy and ginger. While it is possible to find recipes that omit oatmeal or treacle, or even both, these are generally considered distinctive features of Yorkshire parkin, and it is hard to see what would distinguish it from any other gingerbread without them. Both were important constituents of the Northern, working-class diet in the late 18th and early 19th centuries, so it is likely that parkin evolved in that period of the Industrial Revolution. However, Lancashire Parkin is baked using Golden Syrup and extra sugar. The secret of a good parkin is the texture.

One of the key features of parkin is that it retains its texture well and can be kept for a week or two in a sealed tin or box. In fact, connoisseurs often prefer to eat it slightly aged. Fresh parkin is frowned upon, but sometimes eaten as an accompaniment to a compote of tart fruit, like cooking apples or gooseberries. This would have made parkin particularly suitable as a working-class Sunday treat that could be eked out for packed meals on working days. The name is sometimes given as perkin, and it is often pronounced as such in the Midlands, even when the normal spelling is retained. Both Parkin and Perkin are diminutives of Peter. They are also common English family names and were used in the past as pet forms of the Christian name “Peter”.

A Bonfire Treat! Sticky Yorkshire Ginger Parkin with Quince and Pomegranate Compote

A Bonfire Treat! Sticky Yorkshire Ginger Parkin with Quince and Pomegranate Compote

I hope you enjoy my two Bonfire Treats. But, it’s time for me to leave now, I am off to make tea, cheese on toast by the fire! See you tomorrow, when I have a very special weekly meal plan to share with you……..Karen.

PS: The recipes for Sticky Yorkshire Ginger Parkin with Quince and Pomegranate Compote are below.

A Bonfire Treat! Sticky Yorkshire Ginger Parkin with Quince and Pomegranate Compote

A Bonfire Treat! Sticky Yorkshire Ginger Parkin with Quince and Pomegranate Compote

Sticky Yorkshire Parkin

Serves 12 slices
Prep time 30 minutes
Cook time 1 hour
Total time 1 hour, 30 minutes
Allergy Egg, Milk, Wheat
Dietary Vegetarian
Meal type Breakfast, Dessert, Lunch, Side Dish, Snack
Misc Child Friendly, Freezable, Pre-preparable, Serve Cold
Occasion Casual Party, Christmas, Halloween, Thanksgiving
Region British
By author Karen S Burns-Booth
A traditional sticky Yorkshire parkin with oatmeal, ginger, treacle and golden syrup. Leave for 24 hours before cutting and eating for extra stickiness! Perfect for Halloween or Bonfire Night.

Ingredients

  • 225g/8oz self raising flour
  • 55g/2oz medium oatmeal/pinhead oatmeal
  • 110g/4oz soft brown sugar
  • 2 tsps ground ginger
  • 1 tsp bicarbonate of soda
  • 1 egg
  • 200ml/7fl oz milk
  • 55g/2oz butter
  • 55g/2oz golden syrup
  • 55g/2oz black treacle
  • 55g/2oz crystallised ginger (finely cut into small pieces)

Note

A traditional sticky Yorkshire parkin with oatmeal, ginger, treacle and golden syrup. Leave for 24 hours before cutting and eating for extra stickiness! Perfect for Halloween or Bonfire Night.

Directions

Step 1 Preheat the oven to 150C/300F/Gas 2. Line a 22cm/8in square tin or roasting tray.
Step 2 Sieve the flour, sugar, ginger and bicarbonate of soda into a large bowl, then add the oatmeal and crystallised ginger pieces.
Step 3 In a sauce pan gently heat the butter, treacle and syrup until melted.
Step 4 Beat the egg into the milk. Gradually pour the butter and syrup into the flour and stir. The mixture will be thick.
Step 5 Pour in the egg and milk and stir until smooth and pour into the lined tin or tray.
Step 6 Bake for about an hour or until a skewer inserted into the centre of the cake comes out clean
Step 7 Leave for 24 hours in the tin before cutting and eating.
A Bonfire Treat! Sticky Yorkshire Ginger Parkin with Quince and Pomegranate Compote

A Bonfire Treat! Sticky Yorkshire Ginger Parkin with Quince and Pomegranate Compote

Quince and Pomegranate Compote

Serves 6
Prep time 15 minutes
Cook time 30 minutes
Total time 45 minutes
Dietary Vegetarian
Meal type Breakfast, Condiment, Dessert, Side Dish
Misc Child Friendly, Gourmet, Pre-preparable, Serve Cold, Serve Hot
Occasion Casual Party, Christmas, Formal Party, Halloween, Thanksgiving, Valentines day
By author Karen S Burns-Booth
A delectable way to serve quince - simply poached in butter with sugar and with splash of pomegranate syrup added for an extra special flavour burst. Serve this compote with pancakes, parkin, cakes, ice cream or just on its own with cream.

Ingredients

  • 50g (2oz) butter
  • 750g (1 1/2lb) quinces, peeled, cored and diced into slices
  • 100g (4oz) caster sugar
  • 2 to 3 tablespoons Pomegranate syrup (I used Atkins and Potts Pomegranate Syrup)

Note

A delectable way to serve quince - simply poached in butter with sugar and with splash of pomegranate syrup added for an extra special flavour burst. Serve this compote with pancakes, parkin, cakes, ice cream or just on its own with cream.

Directions

Step 1 Melt the butter in a saucepan, add the quince and gently fry in the butter.
Step 2 Sprinkle over the sugar, gently stir until dissolved and simmer for about 8-10 minutes until the quince are soft. Add the pomegranate syrup and allow to cool.
Step 3 Serve warm or leave in the fridge until needed. Reheat gently to serve warm.
A Bonfire Treat! Sticky Yorkshire Ginger Parkin with Quince and Pomegranate Compote

A Bonfire Treat! Sticky Yorkshire Ginger Parkin with Quince and Pomegranate Compote

As I think this recipe showcases the VERY best of British baking and cooking, a traditional recipe of ginger parkin served with a compote of quince, that most Elizabethan of English fruits, I am entering this into the grand finale of The Best of British, hosted by Fiona and New World Appliances

Best of British Master

What family recipes do you make for Bonfire Night?

Comments

  1. says

    Your parkin looks so deliciously sticky and yummy – I made some today for bonfire night too! We always have a big bowl of fiery chilli to warm is up after watching the fireworks. Gorgeous looking accompanying compote.

  2. says

    Wow, that’s so seasonal and lovely. I make parkin to my mum’s recipe but she doesn’t have oatmeal in hers (the recipe is on my blog). I’m working in Yorkshire right now and tried some proper parkin the other day and it was lovely but so heavy. Not sure I could have more than one slice a week! Still, that will put hairs on your chest lass!!!

    • says

      Thanks so much! It is still being enjoyed, and is with parkin, is even better days after it has been made, extra sticky and lush! I will pop over to see your mum’s parkin recipe, maybe next year we need to have a parkin bake off! Karen

  3. says

    Oooh I do love parkin and this compote does look super am sure it must have tasted wonderful together.
    This months one ingredient is Pomegranate by the way (Laura is hosting) – would love you to link up as this is such a super recipe x

  4. says

    I LOVE parkin too, especially with extra ginger – absolutely perfect! Your recipe sounds delicious just as it is but I’d love it with a hunk of cheese too!

    • says

      Thanks Katharine, this is very gingery! I still have half of this Parkin left and it is beautifully sticky and dark now. And yes, this Parkin would be great with cheese too…..Wensleydale I think!

  5. says

    i don’t think i’ve eaten quince like this before, it looks incredible!… and what an excellent idea to eat it with the sweet ginger parkin, very chic! and perfect for tonight, bet those tastes explode in your mouth!

    • says

      Thanks Dom, it was a last minute recipe idea, as I had so many quince left and thought why not make a compote to go with the dark sticky ginger Parkin!

  6. says

    Oh I am so tempted by this and seeing as I am going to a belated firework display this Saturday then I think it could go down very well with my friends. And Nazima is right, you could add it to One Ingredient if you fancy it. Pomegranate molasses is definitely allowed!

  7. Helen Keene says

    Wow the Sticky Yorkshire Parkin looks delicious! I love ginger parkin and will definitely have to have a try at your recipe!

  8. WandaFish says

    I’ll definitely be trying your sticky parkin, it’s one of my all time favourites. I bought one for bonfire night this time and it was dreadful!

  9. Stephen Postlethwaite says

    My word! That parkin looks amazing! I shall have to beg the wife to partake in a spot of baking!

  10. Judith Allen says

    My parents are running a community cafe in March, proceeds going to the MS Trust, and this looks a good cake to take. Not everyone fancies something iced, and a traditional choice is good. And I like it. Which is enough reason really!

  11. says

    I love the recipe… I love the historical details of it… I love the way you write as this make me “live ” in any recipe…
    Many compliments, dear Karen!!!

    Barby (Italy)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>