Country House Light Luncheon Recipe: Edwardian Curried Eggs

Country House Light Luncheon Recipe: Edwardian Curried Eggs

Country House Light Luncheon Recipe:

Edwardian Curried Eggs

Country House Light Luncheon Recipe: Edwardian Curried Eggs

Country House Light Luncheon Recipe: Edwardian Curried Eggs

Sometimes, an aroma can bring back so many memories, a snatched moment in time, misty memories come rushing back like a pressure cooker being released and you yearn for that time again……and all it entails. Such is today’s recipe, it’s redolent of hot, humid school days in Hong Kong, a long  journey back home on a rickety school bus and then a dusty climb up a steep hill, cicadas buzzing in the background with not a breath of air – an itchy school uniform and tired feet that craved escape from “school shoes” and socks, my thick (and unruly) hair scraped back with a headband…..the mosquito screen on the kitchen door bangs and I enter the coolness of the flat to a spicy and rich aroma……..curry!

Country House Light Luncheon Recipe: Edwardian Curried Eggs

Country House Light Luncheon Recipe: Edwardian Curried Eggs

Curries came in many forms in our home when I was growing up, from curried puffs – delicate deep-fried pastries filled with fragrant spiced vegetables to a large bowl of mutton curry with assorted sambals and fluffy naan breads……and then there was mum’s Monday curried rissoles, made with Sunday lunch leftovers, pan-fried in butter and served with mango chutney. But there is one meal that I remember with a huge amount of fondness, a staple from my mum’s thrifty meal planner (especially when meat was too expensive), an easy recipe where the sauce can be made ahead of time and was all the better for it, an Edwardian recipe that was very popular for Country House luncheons and which was a family favourite, Curried Eggs.

Radiation Cookery Book 1933

Radiation Cookery Book 1933

Although I usually follow my mum’s recipe, I was fascinated to see the exact same recipe in my latest new “vintage” book acquisition, the Radiation Cookery Book (1933). And, as my wonderful hens have been laying on overtime since spring has arrived and my egg basket is full to overflowing, I decided to “test drive” a much-loved family recipe for curried eggs that is shared in this book. This curry sauce is fairly Anglicised, insofar that it is made with “curry powder”, but it is extremely tasty nevertheless. And, I DO love the fact that the recipe has apple in it – my mum always adds apple to her curry sauces too. The sauce can be made well ahead of time, before the boiled eggs are added as it is heated to serve. I DID find that there is a LOT of sauce for the amount of eggs that are used, so I popped the excess in the fridge and served it with cooked vegetables on another day.

Edwardian Curried Eggs

Edwardian Curried Eggs

This recipe is perfect for the freezer, sans eggs, and you can of course use your own masala or curry spice mixture. DO try this recipe, it’s cheap and cheerful and very nutritious. That’s it for today, have a wonderful weekend and see you next week, Karen  

What aromas and food brings back happy memories for you? 

Edwardian Curried Eggs

Serves 2 to 3 people
Prep time 10 minutes
Cook time 30 minutes
Total time 40 minutes
Dietary Vegetarian
Meal type Breakfast, Lunch, Main Dish
Misc Serve Hot
Occasion Casual Party, Christmas, Easter, Formal Party
Region Indian
From book Radiation Cookery Book (1933)
An authentic "Edwardian" recipe as published in the Radiation Cookery Book (1933 edition) for curried eggs; this recipe was a mainstay of my childhood and I remember my mum used to use this very same recipe for curried eggs and it was (and remains) one of my favourite dishes. I have tried to keep the ingredients, measurements and method exactly as it was printed in the book. This dish would have been served as a light luncheon dish as well as for a country house style breakfast.

Ingredients

  • 4 large hard-boiled free-range eggs
  • 25g (1 oz) butter
  • 2 teaspoons curry powder
  • 1 tablespoon flour
  • 1/2 small apple, cored and chopped but not peeled
  • 1 onion, peeled and finely diced
  • 300mls (1/2 pint) vegetable stock or water
  • juice of half a lemon
  • 1 tablespoon chutney
  • 50g (2 ozs) rice
  • salt
  • parsley, to garnish

Note

An authentic "Edwardian" recipe as published in the Radiation Cookery Book (1933 edition) for curried eggs; this recipe was a mainstay of my childhood and I remember my mum used to use this very same recipe for curried eggs and it was (and remains) one of my favourite dishes. I have tried to keep the ingredients, measurements and method exactly as it was printed in the book. This dish would have been served as a light luncheon dish as well as for a country house style breakfast.

Directions

Step 1 Melt the butter in a small saucepan. Brown the chopped onions and then stir in the curry powder, flour, stock and chopped apple; simmer gently for 30 minutes.
Step 2 Cut 3 of the hard-boiled eggs in halves. Strain the curry sauce (or leave it as I did) and add the salt (to taste), lemon juice and chutney, and re-heat the eggs in the sauce.
Step 3 Pour (or spoon) the eggs and curry into a dish, cut up the remaining egg into small pieces and use as a garnish with the parsley, and serve the curry in a border of cooked rice. (There is no method for cooking the rice, so cook according to the packet instructions)

Comments

  1. says

    I absolutely love a good egg curry but haven’t ever used apples! Judging by the look and the idea of natures sweet, sour and deep essences in this dish, I need to go and try it x

  2. says

    I’ve never heard of anything like this before but I can imagine it being so lovely and perfect for using leftovers as lunch the next day =)

  3. Sally Duncan says

    I lived in Hong Kong for ten years and can real ate to all your memories.we had a Sri Lankan lady who cooked for us.my children loved her potato curry.
    I love your website.i am a chef and found the only way to my weight down is the 5 2 diet.your recipes are great.
    Sally duncan

    • says

      THANKS so much for your wonderful comments Sally and welcome to Lavender and Lovage, it’s lovely to meet you through my recipes! MORE 5:2 diet recipes to come soon too…..Karen :-)

  4. says

    This is such an unusual dish but it sounds gorgeous. We stuffed ourselves with curry last night so I’m loving how this must have tasted. Love the look of this book too. It sounds brilliant and I adore these classic Edwardian recipes. It makes our trendy cooking seem so flash in the pan! Lovely stuff!!

  5. Heidi Roberts says

    Love the recipe book! I used to make curried eggs when I was a student and have forgotten just how good they were, thanks for reminding me!

  6. says

    As a child curried eggs were my favourite too. That wonderful aroma that filled the whole flat as the eggs soaked up the sauce flavour. Oh how delicious and thanks for the memory. GG

  7. says

    I’ve never made an egg curry before but now I can’t wait to try! And I love that vintage cookbook. I’ve recently also found a Dutch one from 1933 and it’s quite hilarious… I’m planning to remake a dish from it too..

    • says

      This one is also very funny Simone! But, I love the recipes nevertheless, and it’s like a chunk of British social history, as well as old style recipes. :-) I will look out for your dish when you make it…..

  8. says

    These dish sounds very interesting, love how it sounds. One of the best things about cooking curry is the way the kitchen smells.

  9. says

    My Mum has that china – and I’m pretty sure my M-in-law has that cookbook :) Haven’t visited for a while Karen but absolutely love the new look. Really beautiful design and in keeping with your country house look. Gorgeous.

    • says

      Aw thanks SO much Sally! I know I am due a very OVERDUE visit to your blog too, and your visit has reminded me I must do that and catch up on your latest news and recipes! I am so pleased you like my new design too…….Karen

  10. says

    I love the hardboiled eggs in Kedgeree all covered with curry-spiced white sauce, so I’m sure I’d love this recipe. I’ve been branching out into making Indian food at home instead of just going to a restaurant. Just made my first biryani a few weeks ago!

  11. says

    Love this post Karen, many of my favourite things rolled into one: curry, eggs, old books, memories! Egg curry actually reminds me of when I first left home, I transcribed a recipe for it out of one of my dad’s Indian cookbooks because I knew it would be cheap and cheerful. I think I only made it once or twice though, probably because, if I remember right, my housemates ridiculed me about it.

    • says

      Thanks Chloe! Then we are sisters at heart, as I am also a lover of all those things too…..as you may have gathered. Ah, what a shame that your flat mates made jokes about the humble curried eggs, when we know it’s special alchemy! Karen

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