The Wartime Kitchen and Day Five – Ration Book Fish on Friday: Devilled Fish Recipe

Fish and Chips in Black and White

Fish and Chips in Black and White

The Wartime Kitchen and Day Five – Ration Book Fish on Friday:

Devilled Fish Recipe

The Wartime Kitchen and Ration Book Fish on Friday: Devilled Fish Recipe

The Wartime Kitchen and Ration Book Fish on Friday: Devilled Fish Recipe

Today is day five of my wartime ration book cooking challenge, and it’s Friday, which means it has to be fish on Friday. We may not all follow the traditional fish on Friday menu plan nowadays, such a shame I think, but families would have still tried to eat fish on Friday during the war, despite the scarceness of fish as the war progressed. Fish and chips were NOT on ration during the war, and when there was fish available, there were long queues to the “chippie” as soon as the sign “frying tonight” was displayed in the fish and chop shop windows. Those who lived in coastal areas were luckier, as there were still some small boats that had not been requisitioned for wartime duty *(see below), and they would still go out fishing; thus, fish was undoubtedly easier to obtain in traditional fishing ports than in the country, towns or cities. Tinned fish was popular (available with points), as were fish cakes (90% potato!) and preserved fish such as soused herrings and mackerel. In fact, herrings were fairly prolific throughout the war, and many Ministry of Food leaflets were aimed towards herring recipes. Smoked fish may seem to be a luxury today, but due to its long shelf life after smoking, smoked fish was also popular, especially smoked haddock. My mum remembers a favourite supper dish of smoked haddock in milk, in to which fingers of bread were dipped to mop all the precious juices up with. 

HMT Moravia

HMT Moravia: Built at Beverley in 1917 for the Great Grimsby & East Coast Fishing Co
1943 Mined in the North Sea SE of Aldeburg as HMT Moravia FY 1819

The history of fishing trawlers during WW2 is a fascinating one, and although most of us know about the important role that Atlantic convoys contributed throughout the war in order to get supplies to our island nation, not much is known about the bravery of the fishermen and their trawlers, who were called up and entered into Royal Naval Patrol Service. In my research to discover the vital role that trawler-men made, I discovered this fascinating piece of information and photo courtesy of www.llangibby.eclipse.co.uk:

A photograph of MILFORD KING, kindly provided by David Todd, whose father Sydney Arthur Todd (1906-58), was her Chief Engineer from July 1941 to May 1943

A photograph of MILFORD KING, kindly provided by David Todd, whose father Sydney Arthur Todd (1906-58), was her Chief Engineer from July 1941 to May 1943

“As in 1914, 1939 saw a “call-up” of trawlers, and men to crew them.  Fitting-out yards carried out the conversions, while the men were recruited into the Royal Naval Patrol Service, set up in the “Sparrow’s Nest”, a converted theatre in Lowestoft. The trawlers were now allocated Pennant Numbers, with the “Flag Superior” letter or number indicating their roles: FY (“Fishery”) for minesweeping, anti-submarine, dan-laying and other trawlers; Z for boom defence (from 1940 onwards), Y for supply vessels, including the so-called “Essos” or fuel carriers, and 4 for auxiliary patrols, wreck dispersal and a few minesweeping and anti-submarine trawlers.  Dan-layers worked closely with minesweepers to mark the swept channels. Those trawlers employed as Essos for the Normandy landings were effectively made redundant by the commissioning of PLUTO in 1944, and were released early to their owners.  As many purpose-built minesweepers were commissioned during the War, they were able to take over this task from trawlers immediately after VE day, enabling a much quicker return to the owners than after the Great War.”

Fish and chips in newspaper

Fish and chips in newspaper

But back to my fishy recipe, as I was lucky enough to have some fish – coley (saithe), as supplied by John at Delish Fish, whose father played a vital role during the war as part of the RNPS. At this stage I would also like to mention my father too, who was just a little too young to join up during WW2, but who joined the Royal Navy just after the war and spent much of his time in the senior service on minesweepers, (HMS Rattlesnake) and on fishery protection duties in the North Atlantic……as well as being involved in many other theatres throughout the world.

Robbie Burns HMS Wren 1951

MY dad: Robbie Burns HMS Wren 1951

I have digressed……….sorry, now back to today’s wartime recipe, Devilled Fish, a simple and surprisingly spicy fish gratin that only uses 225g of fish. The recipe comes from a great little book called The Stork Wartime Cookery Book, which is filled with some very thrifty recipes and handy tips such as how to cook before, during and after an air-raid warning!

The Stork Wartime Cookery Book

I bought my copy if this interesting little book in a charity shop a few years back and I often turn to it for recipes that are just as relevant to day, using very little fat and sugar. Here’s the recipe, and as you can see it is really just fish in a devilled white sauce with a crunchy bread crumb topping:

Wartime Devilled Fish

Wartime Devilled Fish

Wartime Devilled Fish

Serves 4 to 6
Prep time 15 minutes
Cook time 20 minutes
Total time 35 minutes
Allergy Egg, Fish, Milk
Meal type Lunch, Main Dish, Snack
Misc Child Friendly, Pre-preparable, Serve Hot
Region British
From book The Stork Wartime Cookery Book
A thrifty and yet very tasty wartime dish of fish in a devilled white sauce, cooked au gratin, This recipe makes a pie that is adequate for 4 to 6 people, when served with potatoes and vegetables on the side, or a high tea meal for 4 people when served with bread and butter. The recipe comes from The Stork Wartime Cookery Book.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 lb (225g) cold cooked fish (I used Coley, Saithe)
  • 1 hard-boiled egg (sliced or chopped)
  • 1 1/2 ozs (40g) stale breadcrumbs
  • pinch of Cayenne pepper
  • pinch of mace or grated nutmeg
  • 1 teaspoon curry podwer
  • 1/2 teaspoon made English mustard
  • 2 teaspoons Worcester sauce or tomato ketchup
  • 1 oz (25g) Stork margarine
  • 1 oz (25g) flour
  • 1/2 pint (300ml) milk
  • salt and pepper

Note

A thrifty and yet very tasty wartime dish of fish in a devilled white sauce, cooked au gratin, This recipe makes a pie that is adequate for 4 to 6 people, when served with potatoes and vegetables on the side, or a high tea meal for 4 people when served with bread and butter. The recipe comes from The Stork Wartime Cookery Book.

Directions

Step 1 Flake fish and remove any skin or bones. Grease a pie-dish with a little Stork margarine. Melt the 1 oz of Stork in saucepan, stir in flour and cook until it bubbles. Take off heat and add milk (or half milk and water). Bring to boil, lower heat and cook for 3 minutes, stirring all the time.
Step 2 Add the fish, egg, nutmeg, curry powder, Cayenne, mustard, Worcester sauce or ketchup. Season to taste with salt and pepper.
Step 3 Pour into prepared dish and coat with breadcrumbs, and bake for 20 minutes on moderately hot oven (Regulo Mark 6 - 180C/350F).
Wartime Devilled Fish

Wartime Devilled Fish

On to my rations, my daily meal plan and what I have used and what is left…….today I used: 3/4 pint (300ml) milk, 1 oz (25g) margarine, 1/2 oz (15g) tea, 1/2 oz butter, 1 teaspoon marmalade and 2 ozs (50g) cheese.  And, here is my daily meal plan:

Daily Meal Plan for Friday 9th November:

The Wartime Kitchen Logo

Breakfast: One slice of National Loaf toast with scraping of margarine and marmalade; cup of tea

WW2 Rations Breakfast Day One

Lunch: Devilled Fish with tinned peas and a cup of tea

Devilled Fish

Devilled Fish

 Tea: Quick Welsh Rarebit with Pickle (recipe to follow) and cup of tea

Quick Welsh Rarebit with Pickle

Quick Welsh Rarebit with Pickle

WW2 Rations 1940: Two Adults:

Rations in WW2

* Butter: 3 ozs (75g)  - used 1/2 oz (25g)
Bacon or ham: 200g (8oz) – used one rasher 3/4 oz (20g) : 180g (7 1/4 oz) left
* Margarine: 5 1/2 ozs (135g) – used 1 oz (25g) 
Cooking fat/lard: 200g (8oz) Used 20zs (50g) – 60zs (150g) left
Sugar: 14 1/2 ozs (440g)
Meat: To the value of 2/4d – about 2lb (900g)
* Milk: 4 1/4 pints (1350mls) – used 3/4 pint (450ml)
* Cheese: 6oz (150g) – used 2 ozs (50g) 
Eggs: 2 fresh egg a week – NOT taking this ration up as I have my own chickens
* Tea: 1 1/2 0zs (35g) left – Used 1/2 oz (15g) 
* Jam: 900g (2lb) every two months. Used 1 teaspoon marmalade 1oog (4 ozs) left
Dried eggs: 1 packet (12 eggs) every four weeks
Sweets & Chocolate: 700g (1lb 8oz) every four weeks

The Stork Wartime Cookery Book Cover

The Stork Wartime Cookery Book

 That’s it for today, I hope you have enjoyed my Wartime Fish on Friday post and recipe, one thing I am learning is just how little you need to add to recipes by way of meat or fish to make a filling family meal…….see you later, Karen.

The Wartime Kitchen and Day Five - Ration Book Fish on Friday: Devilled Fish Recipe

The Wartime Kitchen and Day Five – Ration Book Fish on Friday: Devilled Fish Recipe

Join Fiona and Janice in their wartime kitchens too!

 

Comments

  1. says

    Love the look of the devilled fish, my mum used to make a devilled fish recipe which was really just melted butter and curry powder ‘painted’ over the fish and then you grilled the fish. It was delicious and one of the recipes I wrote out to take with me when I left home. Must dig it out again. Great stories about the fishermen and your handsome Dad in his uniform!

    • says

      Thanks Janice, I think devilling was a common procedure in our mum’s days, do you still make your mum’s recipe now? My dad was, still is, a handsome chap! He does look good in uniform though! All the nice girls love a sailor! Karen

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