Using Festive Turkey Leftovers: 5:2 Diet “Turkey Red Flannel Hash with Beans” Recipe

Using Festive Turkey Leftovers: 5:2 Diet "Turkey Red Flannel Hash with Beans" Recipe

Using Festive Turkey Leftovers: 5:2 Diet “Turkey Red Flannel Hash with Beans” Recipe

Using Festive Turkey Leftovers:

5:2 Diet “Turkey Red Flannel Hash with Beans” Recipe

Using Festive Turkey Leftovers: 5:2 Diet "Turkey Red Flannel Hash with Beans" Recipe

Using Festive Turkey Leftovers: 5:2 Diet “Turkey Red Flannel Hash with Beans” Recipe

Red Flannel Hash

(Dictionary.com)

Part of Speech: noun

Definition: a type of hash made with beets and potatoes, sometimes with chopped bacon or beef.

Example: At the restaurant, red flannel hash comes with eggs, served either poached or over easy.

Etymology: 1907

Usage: cooking

Origins: New England

Using Festive Turkey Leftovers: 5:2 Diet "Turkey Red Flannel Hash with Beans" Recipe

Using Festive Turkey Leftovers: 5:2 Diet “Turkey Red Flannel Hash with Beans” Recipe

Hello 2014 and hello 5:2 diet again, after a brief lapse of just under two weeks, with an odd low-calorie day slipped in here and there, I am MORE than ready to grasp my twice a week 500 calorie fast days again. I have LOVED all of the festive food and treats, but I really feel sluggish and I need a detox session badly! My first recipe of 2014 is not surprisingly a 5:2 diet recipe, and one that uses leftovers, TURKEY leftovers if you have any kicking about still. It’s my take on a traditional New England recipe for Red Flannel Hash, but minus the eggs and spuds; my VERY low-calorie version is made with turkey mince, (or cooked leftover turkey), beetroot, beans and a tomato – NOT traditional I know, but there is more than an essence of the original New England Fry-Up in my recipe, which is only 260 calories per serving. In the interests of tradition, which I am very keen to uphold in any culture, I have shared an original recipe for Yankee Red Flannel Hash below my healthy and virtuous version, just in case you have family baying for more calories! We BOTH enjoyed this recipe the other day and Malcolm has asked me to cook it again for a feast day, with eggs and spuds next time though. That’s it for today, I have LOTS of great news, new recipes and giveaways to share over the next few days, so keep popping back to see what’s new! Karen 

Using Festive Turkey Leftovers: 5:2 Diet "Turkey Red Flannel Hash with Beans" Recipe

Using Festive Turkey Leftovers: 5:2 Diet “Turkey Red Flannel Hash with Beans” Recipe

Turkey Red Flannel Hash with Beans

Serves 1
Prep time 5 minutes
Cook time 15 minutes
Total time 20 minutes
Meal type Lunch, Main Dish, Snack
Misc Child Friendly, Serve Hot
Occasion Christmas, Halloween
By author Karen S Burns-Booth
A fabulous way to use up leftover turkey and a very filling diet meal that is perfect for a fast day on the 5:2 diet or for those following Weight Watchers. This recipe has only 260 calories per serving.

Ingredients

  • 4 sprays of low-fat spray oil (I use Fry Light)
  • 1 tomato, cut into small pieces
  • 100g turkey mince or cooked shredded turkey
  • 1 cooked beetroot, cubed (not in vinegar)
  • 100g low-sugar and low-salt baked beans (1/4 of a normal large tin)
  • salt and pepper (to taste)

Note

A fabulous way to use up leftover turkey and a very filling diet meal that is perfect for a fast day on the 5:2 diet or for those following Weight Watchers. This recipe has only 260 calories per serving.

Directions

Step 1 Spray the low-fat oil into a large wok or frying pan and add the tomato, cook it over a medium heat until it is soft.
Step 2 Add the turkey mince (or shredded cooked turkey) and beetroot and cook until the turkey mince is cooked through thoroughly (or the cooked turkey is hot)
Step 3 Add the beans, and some salt and pepper to taste, and continue to cook for a further 3 to 4 minutes until the hash is piping hot and the ingredients are all cooked.
Step 4 Serve immediately with salad or veggies, or crusty bread and a fried egg on a non fast-day.

Recipe: 

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Yankee Red Flannel Hash
By Marcia Passos Duffy

Red Flannel Hash

Red Flannel Hash

Red Flannel Hash was often the traditional meal served after a hearty New 
England corned beef and cabbage dinner — since it was a logical (and frugal)  
recipe that could utilize all that good leftover corned beef, potatoes, cabbage 
and onions.

But the “red flannel” name has sparked some interesting stories about the true 
origin of the dish.  One is that a woman, angry with her husband, threw in his 
red flannels into the dinner hash.  He liked it so much (and was unaware of his 
missing flannels) that, when she was in a better mood, the wife substituted 
beets the next time.  Another story says this dish came into being in Vermont 
during the Revolutionary war when the Green Mountain Boys and Ethan Allen 
grew so desperately hungry that they added their red flannels in with their 
potatoes (although the cold nights in Vermont make this story dubious).

Whatever the origins, you won’t have to add your sweetie’s red flannels to this 
dish.  The red colour comes from the beets in the recipe.

INGREDIENTS:

1/2 cup chopped corned beef (or you can use cooked bacon or hamburg)
1-1/2 cups chopped cooked beets
1 -1/2 cups chopped cold boiled potatoes
1 cup leftover chopped greens (cabbage, kale, etc.) — OPTIONAL
1 medium onion, finely chopped
2 medium garlic cloves, peeled, crushed or finely chopped
1/4 cup heavy cream (or whole milk)
2 tablespoons butter

METHOD:

Heat butter and sauté onion and garlic until soft.  In a large bowl mix together
corned beef, beets, potatoes and greens with the cream or milk.  Stir until
well-coated.  Add mixture to onion/garlic saute in pan.  Stir occasionally until
it is heated thoroughly.  Continue to cook until a brown crust forms
underneath.  Serve with fried eggs.

About the author:  Marcia Passos Duffy is a freelance writer and editor of The Heart of
New England online magazine.  

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