Award Winning Marmalade: Traditional Lemon and Lime Marmalade Recipe

Award Winning Marmalade: Traditional Lemon and Lime Marmalade Recipe

Award Winning Marmalade:

Traditional Lemon and Lime Marmalade Recipe

Award Winning Marmalade: Traditional Lemon and Lime Marmalade Recipe

Award Winning Marmalade: Traditional Lemon and Lime Marmalade Recipe

I cannot believe that is nearly a year ago that I went to a Marmalade Workshop where Vivien Lloyd, who is big in the world of marmalade, showed me and two other blogger friends how to make this fabulous preserve, the traditional way. You can read all about my Marmalade Workshop here: Recipe: Make Award Winning Marmalade – Marmalade Workshop with Vivien LloydA year on and I am still fixated on this citrus preserve, and although I am not sure if I will be entering the Marmalade Awards this year, I am embracing the winter citrus season by making marmalade. Having made traditional Seville orange marmalade, Three Fruit marmalade and some Pink Grapefruit marmalade, I decided to try out a new recipe this year for Lemon and Lime marmalade, one of the numerous marmalade recipes that is in Vivien’s helpful and informative book First Preserves.

Lemon and Lime Marmalade

Lemon and Lime Marmalade

In order to make marmalade, and other preserves, one needs jam jars…..and I would like to extend a BIG thanks to the lovely Adam over at Quickjars who sent me a veritable treasure trove of jars and bottles.…..with enough choice of glassware to fulfil most of my immediate preserving and bottling requirements! As well as assorted jam jars of different shapes and sizes, he also sent me some champagne and wine bottles and smaller bottles that I will be using my annual batch of sloe gin later on this year. All of the jars and bottles came with lids, caps, corks and wire cages too. Quickjars love to work with Food & Drink producers crafting products of uncompromising quality. They love to celebrate real food, great recipes and traditional methods regardless of scale, and their environmentally sourced range of bottles and jars are chosen to reflect the unique quality of all things organic, handmade, local, or simply lovingly created!

Quickjars

Quickjars

But back to my marmalade, this recipe for Lemon and Lime marmalade has become a firm favourite of ours already, with Malcolm my husband proclaiming it to be the best marmalade he has tasted! It’s tangy with a very pronounced lime flavour, like a Mojito or Margarita cocktail and I think I may add some tequila or coconut liqueur to the next batch I make for a very MERRY marmalade……..I have shared Vivien’s recipe below, and before I end for today, I would like to share some step-by-step photos of the whole procedure, which you may find helpful if you fancy making this recipe.

Lemon and Lime Marmalade

Award Winning Marmalade: Traditional Lemon and Lime Marmalade Recipe

Before I share the recipe and images, I have some great news, Adam over at Quickjars has very kindly offered ALL of my readers a FABULOUS discount on your first order of any jars or bottles you order from the site! All you have to do to claim your 15% discount is the following:

To claim your special first time offer of 15% off, all you have to do is to like the Quickjars Facebook page and send them an email via the contact page on their website here: Quickjars Contact,  titled ‘Lavander and Lovage’ (so they know you came from me and Lavender and Lovage . Quickjars we will then send you an individual code to use to save 15%.
Award Winning Marmalade: Traditional Lemon and Lime Marmalade Recipe

Award Winning Marmalade: Traditional Lemon and Lime Marmalade Recipe

That’s it for today, have a great day and DO let me know if you plan to make this (or any other) marmalade. See you soon with more recipes and a new giveaway, as well as some other product reviews. Karen 

Disclaimer: I was sent assorted jars and bottles from Quickjars to use for my preserving – I was not required to write a review post, but I chose to share this with my readers as I rate the jars and bottles very highly.

Award Winning Marmalade: Traditional Lemon and Lime Marmalade Recipe

Traditional Lemon and Lime Marmalade

Serves 4 to 5lbs marmalade
Prep time 24 hours
Cook time 2 hours, 5 minutes
Total time 26 hours, 5 minutes
Dietary Gluten Free, Vegan, Vegetarian
Meal type Breakfast, Side Dish, Snack
Misc Pre-preparable, Serve Cold
Occasion Barbecue, Birthday Party, Casual Party, Christmas, Easter, Formal Party, Halloween, Thanksgiving, Valentines day
Region British
By author Vivien Lloyd
A delicious tangy lemon and lime marmalade made by traditional methods and a welcome addition to any breakfast table, as well as being essential in baking and general cooking, This recipe is by Vivien Lloyd, who has kindly allowed me to reproduce it here. You can see the original recipe in her book First Preserves, as well as in her eBook here: First Preserves: Marmalades.

Ingredients

  • 450g (1lb) limes (about 8 small limes)
  • 225g (8ozs) lemons (about 3 small lemons)
  • 1.4kg (3lbs) granulated cane sugar (NOT preserving sugar)
  • 1.75 litres (3 pints) water

Note

A delicious tangy lemon and lime marmalade made by traditional methods and a welcome addition to any breakfast table, as well as being essential in baking and general cooking, This recipe is by Vivien Lloyd, who has kindly allowed me to reproduce it here. You can see the original recipe in her book First Preserves, as well as in her eBook here: First Preserves: Marmalades.

Directions

Step 1 Traditional Lemon and Lime Marmalade 2
Remove the juice from the fruit and pour it all into a large stainless steel lidded pan with the water. Scrape out the membranes and pips with a sharp knife. (I found this easiest to do after quartering the fruit)
Step 2 Traditional Lemon and Lime Marmalade 4
Finely chop the membranes, I used my Kenwood mixer. Put the chopped membranes and pips into a thin piece of muslin, tie it up with string, and add to the pan of juice, securing it to one of the pan handles.
Step 3 Traditional Lemon and Lime Marmalade 5
If you have not already quartered the citrus fruit shells, quarter them now. Turn them peel side down on to a chopping board and using a sharp serrated knife, slice the peel thinly, almost touching your fingers for a fine shred. Add the peel to the pan and leave overnight to soak.
Step 4 Traditional Lemon and Lime Marmalade 8 (2)
Next day, bring the lidded pan to the boil and then turn down the heat and simmer gently for two hours - the peel should be very tender. .
Step 5 Traditional Lemon and Lime Marmalade 9
Warm the sugar in a low oven set at 140C/275F/Gas1. Remove the muslin bag and squeeze it over the pan through a sieve. Check the volume of the pan, it should have reduced by a third.
Step 6 Traditional Lemon and Lime Marmalade 10
Add the sugar and dissolve over a low heat. Place the jars in the oven. Bring the marmalade to a rolling boil and start to test after five minutes. Once setting point is reached, remove the pan from the heat, and allow to cool for about ten minutes.
Step 7 Traditional Lemon and Lime Marmalade 17
Remove any scum with a metal spoon by pushing it to the side and then removing it. Gently stir the marmalade to distribute the peel. Ladle the marmalade into a jug and pour in the warm jars using a jam funnel. Pour to the brim of the jars. Remove any stray scum with a teaspoon.
Step 8 Traditional Lemon and Lime Marmalade 20
Seal the jars with a new twist-top lid, or apply a waxed disc to the surface of the marmalade. When cold, cover with a cellophane top secured with a rubber band.

Award Winning Marmalade: Traditional Lemon and Lime Marmalade Recipe

Award Winning Marmalade: Traditional Lemon and Lime Marmalade Recipe

The preparation, cooking and bottling procedure through images:

Lemons and Limes

Lemons and Limes

Juicing the fruit

Juicing the fruit

Cutting the shreds

Cutting the shreds

Putting the chopped membranes and pips in a muslin bag

Putting the chopped membranes and pips in a muslin bag

A long soak overnight

A long soak overnight

What it looks like after soaking

What it looks like after soaking

Simmering the peel, water, juice and the bag of membranes for 2 hours

Simmering the peel, water, juice and the bag of membranes for 2 hours

Adding the warmed sugar

Adding the warmed sugar

Allow the sugar to dissolve

Allow the sugar to dissolve

Bring to a rolling boil

Bring to a rolling boil

Skim off scum and allow to sit for 5 minutes before stirring and potting

Skim off scum and allow to sit for 5 minutes before stirring and potting

Pot into clean, hot jars

Pot into clean, hot jars

Pot in clean jars using a jam funnel

Pot in clean jars using a jam funnel

Fill right up to the top of the jars

Fill right up to the top of the jars

Seal with new, clean lids

Seal with new, clean lids

ENJOY in toast!

Award Winning Marmalade: Traditional Lemon and Lime Marmalade Recipe

Award Winning Marmalade: Traditional Lemon and Lime Marmalade Recipe

Award Winning Marmalade: Traditional Lemon and Lime Marmalade Recipe

Award Winning Marmalade: Traditional Lemon and Lime Marmalade Recipe

Award Winning Marmalade: Traditional Lemon and Lime Marmalade Recipe

Award Winning Marmalade: Traditional Lemon and Lime Marmalade Recipe

 

Comments

  1. says

    Hi Karen thanks for sharing this wonderful recipe I absolutely love a lime and lemon marmalade and the fact you can make it a bit Merry sounds wonderful. I will Def be making thus and probably add a bit of rum to it.

  2. says

    I love marmalade. If I have a really intense workout, then I usually have something sugary before and marmalade on toast is a better choice than sugary junk cereal. I really want to get in to canning/preserving, even if it is just for a nice collection of jars haha. I don’t think my jar collection would be quite so impressive though :)

    • says

      Thanks Dannii! I am on a diet, as you know, but on a non-fast day some home-made jam and now marmalade is always enjoyed on a slice of toast, as a treat! Karen

  3. says

    Your marmalade looks absolutely stunning Karen. I would love to try some of this on my morning toast. I feel very naughty as my mother is very disparaging about anything that calls itself marmalade which isn’t made with seville oranges. I gave her some of the lemon marmalade I made last year and never heard the end of it – she gave it back!

    • says

      Thanks!Really? That is so funny Choclette! In actual fact she is also wrong, as the original marmalade was made from quinces! Maybe you should make some quince marmalade and see what she says then! :-) Karen

  4. says

    Karen, it looks delicious and the photo’s are stunning. Don’t think I’ve ever had lemon & lime together, tis now bookmarked!
    Janie x

  5. says

    I can’t believe I’ve STILL not made Marmalade. Plenty of jams, pickles and chutneys over the last few years but still not Marmalade. I blame this fact entirely on my Dad, who happens to make the best Marmalade (and jams and chutneys) I know, though I’m probably biased, and seeing as he has a ready stash of each and every permutation of the goodly stuff 20 minutes away I don’t feel the compulsion yet to make my own! Lime or Lemon & Lime are my definite favourites too. I love your pictorial steps btw, gorgeous pics Karen!

  6. says

    Karen the marmalade looks fabulous and like Louisa said I have no clue why I haven’t attempted making any YET! I am certainly taking the 15% OFF offer and am going to stock up on some of those pretty bottles and jar right away !
    I consider myself quite the chutney maker but these lovely step wise photographs have tempted me to enter marmalade territory! And yes even a tiny tasty jar at FBC2014 will do for me, I will make it a MERRY one when I get home hehehe!Great suggestion Nayna :)

    • says

      Thanks Manjiri, and DO take advantage of the discount code as 15% a goodly sum to save! I too am a BIG chutney maker, I LOVE the stuff, but I do like a bit of citrus peel on my toast too!

  7. says

    it really does look so special Karen and well deserves its award-winning status… I have yet to make marmalade so I really should get on and make some as I have plenty of jars to fill… lovely recipe to share, thank you x

  8. Tracy Nixon says

    I have made a list of the ingredients so going to buy them and make this over the weekend. My Aunty makes jam too so I have printed this off for her. I have never made this type of jam before – usually strawberry, blackberry, plum etc – so I am looking forward to the challenge.

  9. says

    Karen, I like to keep up the January marmalade tradition, but just can’t manage it this time. :-( Oh well, I still have a few jars from last year’s marmalade marathon! I seem to go to one extreme or the other. This year I’ll content myself with poring over this post!

      • says

        Well, Karen, I finally got around to marmalade making — better late than never! And I can’t seem to stop! Just made another small batch of kumquat marmalade, and kumquats will still be available for a while, so I’ll probably be making it again. Must attend a Vivien Lloyd workshop one day.

  10. Heather says

    Hi Karen

    At the end of stage one and it’s going to soak overnight. Quite therapeutic chopping all the fruit after stress day at work.

    I got carried away and cut a lot of the pith off. Will it matter? It’s in the muslin bag with the rest of the membrane. Can’t really stick it back on, though, can I ?!!

    Stage 2 tomorrow evening. Looking forward to tasting it properly on Friday as Thursday is fast day. I’ll let you know how it turns out.

    Thanks for sharing it!
    Heather.

    • says

      Hi Heather!

      YES! The more pith you cut off the better and that’s where it should be, in the muslin bag, adding to the pectin of the marmalade!

      REALLY looking forward to seeing how you like it and how stage two goes too!

      Karen

      • Heather says

        Hi Karen!

        Thanks for the reassurance about removing the pith. In the recipe for the Seville Orange marmalade (Feb 2013) at Step 1 it said not to remove the pith from the oranges, so I thought it might be the same for the lemon and lime marmalade too.

        So, back to my marmalade. I finished it off last night. It took a while to get it to setting point, so I may not have reduced it quite enough. But, after a bit of boiling and no need to remove any scum (I was surprised about that) it decided that it would set after all and I bottled the lot. Even in a liquid state it tasted gorgeous!

        Breakfast this morning (I didn’t have to wait until Friday!) was tea, toast and lemon & lime marmalade. Absolute bliss. The lemon and lime marmalade is fantastic, I’m so pleased with it. It’s not got a really firm set, so it spreads easily. Taste-wise it’s not overpowering, so the balance of sweet and citrus is really nice. I could happily eat it with a spoon!!

        Although I’ve made plenty of jam before, I absurdly pleased with my first marmalade. Thank you, again, for sharing. Now, which one to make next….?!

        Heather

  11. Jammy Jane says

    Thanks for this recipe. For the sake of beginners such as me, please indicate when the water should be added. It may be obvious to experts but not to novices.

  12. Roxanne says

    Thanks so much for this recipe! I made lemon marmalade last year, but the recipe called for water bath canning at the end. I see your recipe does not and was wondering if this need to be kept in the fridge or can they go in the pantry? And how long will they keep for out of the fridge. Please forgive my ignorance on the subject. Would love to make this without having to can them.

    • says

      These will keep for at least a year in a cool, dry place such as a pantry as long as they have a vacuum seal, which happens when you seal them when they are hot – see my instructions!

  13. Romana B. says

    Dear Karen,
    thank you very much for this recipe. I tried to make the marmalade yesterday and it turned out very well. It was pretty thrilling for it was my first marmalade so far ;) I really wanted to give it a try for lemon marmalade is not common in the country where I live (Czech Republic). And it is so delicious :) I wish you all the best! ;)

  14. Maura says

    Hi, I’m a huge fan of your recipes and also of Vivien LLoyd – I use her Jam & Marmalade recipes all the time. I was a bit concerned about the dark colour of my lime shreds ( looked almost black) when I first tried the lemon & lime recipe but now I can see your excellent photos I can see they do in fact darken up. I am relieved! I make and sell my preserves to raise money for several charities and therefore I need to be able to buy my jam jars as cheaply as possible so was really disappointed to see the cost of the jars on Quick Jars website – sadly they are well out of my price range. Thanks for such an interesting & informative website.

  15. Tricia says

    Hi I was wondering how successful it is when you double the recipe? I have to make lots for the school fete so would prefer to make 10 jars at a time. Thank you

    • says

      I am not a fan of doubling up on marmalade, as you will need an very large pan to boil it down; however, why not prepare double and cook it separately, so you cook on the same day?

  16. Tony says

    Hi. Dumb Australian male here with tree full of lemons….but it doesn’t tell me in the recipe when or what to do with the water !

  17. Beverly Jane Reynolds says

    I am really excited to try this scrumptious recipe! Thank you to all who left lovely replies too. It makes it even more of a hurry for me to try it I must go and get jars and lids first tho’. I already bought the lemons and limes. We had a large family all grown now so I am not sure my hubby’s sweet tooth will like this. I know I will love it. lemon being a favorite of mine. Thanks everyone. Bev

  18. Beth from California says

    I tried making marmalade for the first time – mine turned out much too bitter. I will try again, but his time will not chop the pith much less, to only a coarse texture. I will not squeeze the bag – pith can be quite bitter. Have you any other suggestions for people who do not like bitter flavors?

  19. jacky says

    Hi,
    I adore limes, and haven’t made marmalade for roughly 30 years when I made it for my Brownie badge! Although I still bear some of the mental and physical scars of that evening I am determined to give this a go – I can almost taste and smell it, just looking at your beautiful photographs.
    My one query is, step 5, ‘warm the sugar’. I wondered if maybe that should be ‘warm the jars’? If it isn’t and I do need to warm the sugar, do I just spread it over a baking try and wait until warm, or does it change structure in any way?
    Thank you for putting this recipe up and inspiring me to give marmalade another go!

    • says

      Hi Jacky! Lovely to see you here!
      No, it is warm the sugar – basically, you pop the sugar in an oven-proof bowl (a ceramic mixing bowl is fine) and put it in a warm oven for about 10 minutes – what happens is that when warm sugar is added to the pulp, juice etc, it dissolves more rapidly and you can achieve a rolling boil quicker, which means the colour stays brighter!
      Please do let me know how this turns out for you!
      Karen

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